The bronze sculpture of Sun Yat-sen, located in Nagasaki, Japan. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Revolution of 1911 and to remember the great support of Japanese friend Mr. Umeya Shoji for China’s “revolutionary pioneer” Sun Yat-sen and the Chinese democratic revolution, the State Council Information Office and the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences will present Japan Bronze statues of Mr. Sun Yat-sen and Mr. Umeya Shoji were presented.

Nagasaki is surrounded by mountains on three sides and facing the sea on one side, and is a city with many slopes. The hillside is lined with European-inspired houses, which are absolutely unique. The houses on the hillside are short, and even in the city center, high-rise buildings are hard to find. Nagasaki has a population of less than 500,000, and most of them live alone. Trams are the most important means of transportation for Nagasaki people, and they are environmentally friendly and fast, so that people have left the buses a bit. Almost all the major characteristic locations in Nagasaki can be reached by tram.

Nagasaki cast bronze sculpture in Japan

Nagasaki cast bronze sculpture in Japan

Nagasaki, once a small fishing village, gradually developed into a trading port due to the arrival of the grape people in 1571. For more than 200 years since the middle of the 17th century, the Edo shogunate adopted a closed-door policy. Nagasaki, as Japan’s only open port, has traded with the West and China. Nagasaki is more like a window to Japan, introducing overseas culture and information to all parts of Japan. The arrival of many Chinese merchant ships has also accelerated the influx of Chinese culture. Needless to say in Chinatown, the Chongfu Temple, Xingfu Temple, Shengfu Temple, and Fuji Temple built by monks in the Ming Dynasty are still there today. Not only were we able to export culture at that time, but the spectacle stone bridge we built can still be used today.